WWL>Topics>>04-16 7:45 am Community Matters - Addiction

04-16 7:45 am Community Matters - Addiction

Apr 16, 2017|

Are we born with addiction? Dan Forman with Dependency Pain Treatment Centers discusses opioid addiction. Plus, Joy Sutton with American Addiction Centers highlights the “Truth Behind the Numbers” community forum at Xavier University.

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

Well the first time in New Orleans history and deaths from accidental drug overdoses so past murders this is startling number. Due to an increase in the abuse of heroin and all at the opening night. But John right now by Dan Foreman Dan is the president and CEO of dependency pain treatment center. Good morning to you Dan thanks agreement thanks for an assumption this morning what do people in your industry make of that news well. Markets absolutely an epidemic. I don't think any of us have seen an epidemic like this with drug overdoses in the past it's very dangerous. And in many ways it's been part of this has been caused by the medical industry itself. In that. Many people who come to us who are struggling with a little Buick dependency. Were originally prescribed pain medication. Legal pain medication. But then they had a reaction to the pain medication where they actually had a a light bulb go off on their brain after the first time in their lives they actually felt normal. So what we're telling them to stop taking the pain medication that they should be better by now all of a sudden we're telling them basically you can't feel normal anymore and so they're seeking. That relief and that feeling of normalcy elsewhere on the street was soft at least three legal drugs. Are they basically better but they don't think they're better and that's why they continue to watch our chase that feeling. Time after time well it's it's really fascinating to see what what's what's being discovered in science about addiction with this epidemic right now we're using genetics to really determine if people were born with this illness vs its just someone using a substance abusing the substance. The chronic brain disease of addiction is very different than substance abuse. Addiction as a disease so they were born with and I'm symptoms include. Drug overuse alcohol food sex gambling. Never feeling normal. Even in childhood with out an outward substance. As opposed to substance abuse which is to someone who's doing something stupid with drugs or how well he would be wise. Well whatever happens to be. But because of what we're net where we're learning in science about the disease of addiction were actually able to treat it earlier then. We used to have to wait for someone hit there proverbial bottom anymore. We're joined by Dan Foreman president CEO of dependency paint treatments senators with talking about. Opening night addiction and we're talking about for the first time in a while his history deaths from accidental drug overdoses surpassing murders. Has the conversation about what this is. Really changed over the years because at one time it was your mama did you lack together you're hurting your mom and dad. How has it changed and has it changed enough. But that it's it's really interesting again you bring this topic up because it's hot topic online right now. You know we look at the eighties with the crack epidemic. And why were people treated so poorly during the cricket and your mom and as opposed to today with OB Lloyds. Where people are really being treated like an illness and and I think the minds of this changing. I think it's reflective over all of us as a society becoming more accepting and understanding. And I think it's really the millennial generation who have. Been raised within this epidemic ever seeing it differently. We are having a it's it's incredible how many people understand now and who really do seem to care be compassionate. About this illness giving people a chance to get better supposed to incarcerating. So do you think it is merely less to do about. Economic status. On ethnicity that we've just calm much farther along in general and our our appreciation as to what is happening I think is vote and. Emotionally I absolutely think that some of it has to do with with but. Financial. With the with race I mean I think has a lot to do with that and it's very sad that that happened. There is now in much better scientific understanding of the illness as opposed to what we had in the eighties. Which really does help us actually illustrate the point. That people can get better that this is a brain illness as opposed to each choice of people who make. Some of the data suggest that that this type of addiction is highly treatable it's highly treatable illness. That only 11% of those addicted received treatment why is that answer so correct. Addiction is a highly treatable ailments and that's what is so exciting about what we do it depends seeking treatment centers but it's impairments of sad to think that only one in ten people actually get help. So we're seeing over and over again is that the reason people will not get help us to do with time. They don't wanna commit to going to a ninety day rehab program I think that's the only winning a better. To his money it's expensive to help well good thing our program accepts medical insurance so few of medical insurance or pay for your treatment. And third is the stigma of addiction which I think is getting better. Overall people still have a fear that people are gonna find out that they have this illness it's not it's still not as wiley X is accepted. As other illnesses. So what we've done a dependency between prisoners as we've removed. Those three barriers the time barrier. The financial barrier and the stigma barrier to a people get help. Any medical office environment. One day a week where they come in the medical intervention counseling and legal home they go back to work. And nobody knows you're gonna help just like any other medical issue you Goodyear. Other doctors for a especially here you go your addiction I'll just it's. Prediction here the same thing you control who knows your story who knows that you're going through this absolutely that's that's a key part of it and and our goal is to help patients feel well enough to engage in life without having these substances so it's not. Some some deep. Lay on the couch. Scary program where. Here you're giving everything of your timing your your you're emotional resources to this thing it really is. In medical program he commented we he'll prescribe medication that can help you withdraw safely from one every year on. And either counseling you need to sustain recovery. So then is every once susceptible and birth cars it's it's hereditary how do you know. That your in that number are and you should at all costs avoid some of these up. Science has come a long way in the last few years especially with a lot of these over the counter genetic tests that we have access to ample resource and huge pool of genetic results to review now. Specifically here's the a genetic defects in on the structure of our genes called and TH a far. And it's something we look for often and in patients who have addiction. Not a diagnostic tool but we often see the patients who have empty ship are also parallel patients to struggle with the disease of addiction so knowing that. There's a certain percentage of the population who were born with this illness meaning they have addiction before they ever use their first substance and so. Often times we see that patients that we treat we're diagnosis children with dvd or with the attention seeking behaviors or with other risk taking behaviors. Motorcycles I mean he knows. Bicycling off the the couch or something like that I mean like we see risk taking behaviors is a big part of this so we understand it. Those are dope mean. Spiking things that they look for they're there they're always trying to manipulate their own opening because not feeling well without it. So. Those of the patients that we typically treat those who have those early behaviorist who were born with addiction. But we still a long way to go as far as our understanding of exactly how to diagnose this with genetics. When you work with people and youth stressed that this is not their fault what is usually their reaction. Tears I mean it is there. Well in many situations throw people's lives everyone tells them they should just stop but who went through this big campaign in the eighties to sing now. Which ended up incarcerated a lot of people who have gotten better if they'd just gotten the help they needed if we had taken the time to invest in treatment as opposed to jail. Back in the 1980s this will be different society now this would be. Completely different country because we would then have a lot more recovering people in the world will be able to pass that recovery on. To new people that are struggling but instead they're in prison. Weathered it and so that's a big thing for us now is is really focusing on that that treatments and incarceration. Dan Foreman joins us president CEO of the pendency pain treatment centers for talking about for the first time. And nor is history deaths from accidental drug overdoses of the past murders in 2016. And we're talking about this OpenId debt epidemic. And also that there is hope there isn't this a good outcome they can be sought in can be found with this as well. And and and again Ali of people in your industry coming together because you know it's moving kind of quickly now in value coming together and the best practices. I just finding out what really needs to happen going forward with this. So there's a national organization called the American society of addiction medicine and those of the practices that we follow. It's really a national thing takeover of the leaders in addiction Knology. They also offering specialty in addiction elegy for medical practitioners. And they actually just had their national convention in New Orleans last week. It was incredible we had we had doctors from all over the country and you wouldn't believe the number of different opinions about the best way to treat this and so it's so important. That everyone participates in this American society of addiction medicine. Organization because it is able to sort of generate the best practices what people are actually seeing. In the fields and this is a frightening illness because right now we're dealing with opiates of Hewitt's payments. Heroin. But tomorrow could be something completely different it doesn't matter if the scene disease it's just different symptoms so we need to fix fix this now and figure out what. The best practices are now so we can avoid the next epidemic. So you get to the point those who are dealing with this addiction that there cured eyes that always for the rest of their allies because they were. Born with it right so there so we consider remission. The nation is in remission from addiction but we'll always have addiction. And actually one of the things that we do encourage our patients to do is get involved with some sort of social environment or get around other people who have addiction. Whether that's through twelve step programs which helps a lot of our patients there other things through churches through other ways that we can take action and be of service to the community. Because we need to be around people who were in the early stages of addiction who were struggling with a on this. Because it reminds us of where we can go again this thing never goes away it does not get better myself people tried for years and years to get better. And they don't in the ethernet in jail or dying or absolutely miserable. But there is solution it is treatable illness. We can help patients get into remission murders of someone else Pinehurst people and he's he's taking action that the food and someone. Doesn't matter to us as a matter of hope someone and get help because there are a lot of different ways to do a lot of different options available. Treatable. And again thank you for being with with the game we appreciate it. We're going to continue the conversation about addiction and Xavier University will be the size of a community forum called truth behind the numbers in dealing with addiction. It takes place at this Thursday beginning at 6:30 PM. We spoke to joy Sutton with American addiction centers about how the conversation. Around addiction needs to change. We just not viewing addiction as a moral feeling. That somehow this is a moral issue and really recognize it for the brain disease that it is and it there's a large genetic component to it. And I think once we start looking at this is a disease it changes the way we look at treatments and how we discussed it. Inner communities and with our families and with our loved ones so that we can really get to the root of the problem. The forum this Thursday it will feature a number of noted panelists on addiction. Well this isn't really an opportunity for the community to come out and learn about the disease of addiction you know we have to be willing to talk about the in one year we see the number of overdose deaths double. Double when you really listen to that that staggering and that's why Xavier University American addiction centers and Townsend. Our party together for this form we see it it's just that important. And we have five analysts who are going to be participating. As experts and giving their. Inside into the problem. We have doctor Howard Weitzman he's the founder and chief medical officer of Townsend. Which is a network of treatment centers located right here throughout south Louisiana he also the author of three books including question and answers on addiction. We had the CEO of a mere addiction centers which is Michael Hart right he's actually worked on fifteen federally funded grants on addiction. And he is a recovering addict himself so he can bring a lot of perspective to the problems that were facing he's also the author of believable hope. Five essential elements to be any ethnic addiction. We also have to Xavier professors from the college of pharmacy we have doctor Jessica Johnson and doctor Thomas my extreme. And we also have doctor Rory eerie he is an emergency medicine specialists in a position accounts and so we happen theory. Well rounded panel. Many people may also recognize our moderator for this event Miree movement calls to the former TV personality. And she also is a prevention specialists with action against addiction. And what are they hoping to accomplish. From this form we really hope to raise awareness about the disease of addiction and to let people know that it's treatable. That their hope we need to be willing to talk about this it's not something that we can. Just forget about I think it's not our problem or not our family went ten to 20% of the population is dealing with this affects all of us so we have to be willing to talk about it. So that we can get Sony Pictures Joey has more information on how the community can be a part of this forum. Now for those who wanna learn more about the event your listeners should visit C dear forum dot advent bright dot com what's again that the year. For not very bright dot com now they don't have to register with his ass since we shall we have to be willing to time. We have to be willing to this community problem together to. That is our show for today thinking so much for joining us until next time he enjoyed this Sunday and the rest of your week.