WWL>Topics>>06-04 7:30 am Community Matters

06-04 7:30 am Community Matters

Jun 4, 2017|

WWL’s Monica Pierre discusses various community projects and services that benefit the infrastructure of Greater New Orleans.

Related Audio:

  1. 05-28 7:30 am Community Matters

    Audio

    Sun, 28 May 2017

    WWL’s Monica Pierre discusses various community projects and services that benefit the infrastructure of Greater New Orleans.

  2. 05-21-17 7:30 am Community Matters

    Audio

    Sun, 21 May 2017

    WWL’s Monica Pierre discusses various community projects and services that benefit the infrastructure of Greater New Orleans.

  3. 05-14-17 7:30 am Community Matters

    Audio

    Sun, 14 May 2017

    WWL’s Monica Pierre discusses various community projects and services that benefit the infrastructure of Greater New Orleans.

  4. 05-07-17 7:30 am Community Matters

    Audio

    Sun, 7 May 2017

    WWL’s Monica Pierre discusses various community projects and services that benefit the infrastructure of Greater New Orleans.

+

Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

Good Sunday welcomed you can go to thank you so much for joining us today I mean a vote on the coming up it's more than just the. Creation and bones spirit this experiment. Prostitution. Is going. Details on the historic New Orleans election exhibition on the city's bond on red light district. An injury after the closing the story bill. And yeah. An exciting time we think it's. More on efforts to reform the prison them in Louisiana. A century after the closing of stories they'll be historic New Orleans election has pieced together the remnants of New Orleans is buying gone red light district in a new exhibition called. Story bill in the Adams and music don't need to talk about it are Eric's the firth historian of the exhibition of the historic New Orleans collection. And Pamela Arsenault author of guide books to sit and the blue book of stories build New Orleans. Good morning thank you both for being with that thinking you like what are we began century after the closing the story of bill. Why is this exhibition so interest being for so many let's begin with you Pamela. Well it's it's more than just about the creation of the vice district this experiment in the control of prostitution and other forms of vice. A hundred years ago it's also a study of a neighborhood. And the music the clubs. The as well as the brothels that led to the rise of new form of music. They describe. What they were all kinds of sounds going on this period one of the predominant popular form at the time was ragtime. But there were a core of musicians in New Orleans who were working in the braunfels. But on their off time they were experimenting with Cink patients new sounds new kinds of chord progression. What would eventually become known as jam as our exhibition not only. Commemorates. The closing of the story build district and this experiment came to an end. With a legal ordinance. That ended the district on November 12. 1917. But this also commemorates the release of the first recorded. Japan's. Music. Jazz is so associated with New Orleans and with story bill but we want to emphasize with our exhibition that. There were many kinds of forms of music going on in the district. Who bet that's part of what this exhibition soul now. So Eric as the story an exhibition curator and kind of walk us through lead analyst and a great job so. Take me through what will see. Sure absolutely had left you. We you know have broken up this base into a few different teams are chapters we wanna orient the visitor. Which reduce the maps and kind of give them a timeline. In in our tax panels of the period we're talking about historical. Is open from 189018. And 1917 the the original ordinance is passed an eight and seven that's about a twenty year period we talk about some of the larger brothels. That world would have been on base in street. Custom house survivor bill. Common and who was there who was working there are some of the more prominent and Adams we also have a a wonderful map of the whole neighborhood and see concede. Com where those brothels or were some of these smaller. Houses of prostitution words from the even smaller cribs. We talk about the music in the brothels this would have been different in the music in the clubs. Announced we give you an introduction into those sound to his plane there what they were playing. And then we talk about the music in the rest of the neighborhood. The clubs the different bands there that were there the band leaders. In the popular music and we and we finish it off with a discussion of how story bill ended in kind of what. Came after in that area in and Howell the district lingers on in our popular memory and then of course we also have a section. Dedicated to people who books of story of bill which you know as you mentioned Campbell is that we are very proud to say the our author I say for this or or or those collection of guidebooks to sin thank you honorable yeah you're welcome it looks a story bill. So there really would guidebooks dissent yet and I'll let Pamela you there. Just fascinating did you need need a guidebook but yet tell us about the guidebook that says well. Our new publication. That you mentioned guidebooks to send the blue book's story build New Orleans. It is an annotated deadly art graffiti it turns out we have a very large number of these little guide books. And they listed the houses of prostitution. And they were also directories to women who worked in the district. But beyond that there are also advertisements. For goods and services of interest to men. The new aerial disease cures. Liquor cigar. Believe it or not mineral waters. Champagne. All of these services. Are our marketing the district as an entertainment destination. Again we're we're trying to emphasize that story bill was more than just the elaborate braunfels. And the prostitution. These guidebooks. Actually marketed the entire area as a place where tourists. And mailed Taurus of course to go debt thing to hear the news sounds. To relax have a good time it's sort of the beginning of establishing New Orleans has. A good time placed ago. Of the blue books were produced pretty much on an annual basis. Released around horrible time. In anticipation. Of more visitors coming in and New Orleans was being touted by city fathers as a winter tourist destination. And within that these little blue book's. We're promoting the district. Four and then hosting facility. So wind and it all changes come to an end under the laws changed but so basically what was going on that the people wrong woke up one day said that we shouldn't have this anymore because this is this and this is wrong. No it hit and it wasn't that it would then again it was a problem. And story bill was a means of trying to control the problem. When story bowl was created the idea was to. Gather up all the prostitutes. And have them stay in one. A geographical location. They didn't have to live there but they could only ply their trade. In a certain geographic area which came to be known this story bill or the district. As time went on during this twenty year period. Attitudes changed. There was a rising middle class there was. The progressive error moralist. Who did not want to contain. Prostitution they wanted to eradicate it. And they were seeing that. A red light districts such as the story bill. Was not actually containing the ultimate problem which was venereal disease. So it it was determined that. A red light districts were ineffective. In this trying to control both prostitution. And disease. And as of the United States. Came nearer to entering World War I and it was discovered that recruits were already infected. It was determined that. This experiment. This ineffective. Experiment had to come torn. We're joined by a panel Arsenault author about the guidebooks to send the blue book the story of bill in New Orleans. As well as scary exe for earth and the New Orleans collections a historian an exhibition curator. So what do the dates and how can is it mostly for local you think of the be interested in story bill ours is something that Taurus once. What they come here would like to see. I think absolutely both. There for locals Hampshire everyone in the city has heard. The name story goal you know about you probably know something about the music that's going on around the turn of the century and an absolutely would recognize some of the musicians. In the exhibition guys like. General Morton. Who played there we mentioned Louis Armstrong. Who grew up in the uptown or black story of old neighborhood and played some in both districts. Tom King Oliver there's some other names I think people Earl will recognize and will be. Excited to learn more deeply about a subject they may have heard in passing. Or has that cache yeah yeah absolutely and and I think out of town visitors are gonna be. Excited to see some of those same names as well and be able to place them within. New Orleans and see where they started their careers and in where they you know in the case of someone like Armstrong grew up and you know our I have the feeling as Pamela said this is kind of the beginning of the of new worlds is a destination city winter tours some city. In. You know a place known for its adult entertainment. From which lingers on and I I have the feeling that people from around the country and you know we have a number of international visitors to our going to. Be excited to learn more about about that time I hope they are in so far so good that they exhibition opened. Come on on Wednesday. April April 5 so we've been open it just a couple of weeks. From indigo runs through December 2. That's at 410. Charters street open 930 to 430 Tuesday through Saturday. Opened doors there's no mom no feet succumb and walked through the exhibition so. Gonna be at the on the Williams resource center exactly yes but Hewitt at something when about. You know whose interest is. You know all century later. Certainly the district has influenced filmmakers we have. The shooting script and a poster from the 1978. Louis Malle film pretty baby there's very little left of story felt that holding area was bulldozed. In the 1930s and early forties for the construction of the article housing project. Which in turn has been torn down as well. But there are a few architectural fragments that we have on display we have the fantastic. Glass trends some. That came from mahogany hall Lulu white's famous brothel. And we have a mirror panel from Jozy Arlington is mirrored music and ballroom. The elaborate mentions that exist that are part of the the legend of this district and I think people will be interest in seeing. Those few ephemeral things that have gone the blue books are part of that too they're part of the few tangible. Programme notes of historical does. It makes your work as trying to piece together in this history because so much was lost two history. When you did guidebooks to send the blue book the story of el nuance and you had the blue books but there was and challenging trying to. To bring all this back to life. Who else but it was something that I really got into as a librarian and these guidebooks are sort of deadly graphic aspect of the sex trade. So it. Whilst very interesting absolutely any bless the worst about where Eric people can learn more the social media all you reps. I absolutely our website is www. H and sociedad orgy. I'm so it it'll have information is to. When the exhibit is open in our our daily hours all of that so. Go there if you if you'd like to learn more. About the show elect has said it's Tuesday through Saturday 930 to 430 in the way threes or senator for ten charter street. We wearing a lot of hats on to Pamela because you're also a curator of the exhibition as well co curator Eric and with John Lawrence or director of programs. Also want to mention our web site also includes links to our Shaw. And our publications department and people can go there and purchase guidebooks to send as well as other. Publications that are. Institution has produced over the past years. Will they always see the title is is part of the Yahoo! deal lord's going integration idol you soma big people of being with those camera Arsenault has grown they are deeper. They actually having. Talking this time about criminal justice reform and they joined by mr. Flozell Daniels the CEO and president. A foundation for Louisiana. Was they'll thank you for being with Good Morning America thinks enemy there's been so much dialogue over the years about prison reform especially in Louisiana. An overview of where we go on right now. You know it's it's an exciting time we think it's a moment in history first you have the incredible reforms that are being pushed here in the city of New Orleans. We produce the goods local GO rate historically over the last six or seven years. And you see the municipal bail reform and see reform happening at the jail. You see other kinds of things happening. And now we have and with the leadership of governor John Della woods. Are promoted by a resolution set forth by representative Walt. That has recommended. A suite of bills that are now being set forth in the legislature. That gives us the state a historic opportunity. As to repair the harm that the criminal justice system is done families. To create a situation when communities can be made more safe. And that gives us a chance to save money. Hundreds of millions of dollars Monica in ways that we can reinvest in families and communities again to make us safer. To make families strong growth to make communities more close. And a return on our investment as tax and actual return and your investment and it's an excellent point you make. One of the things we tell people as we have spent billions of dollars on things that don't pork. And we would never allow that than any other arena housing. Economic development. You would be calling it corruption you would be saying I'm a tax Payer. You're spending hundreds of millions and billions of dollars on things and actually don't work. How would we do that answer this is our chance that's a really precept of the fact that we've been doing that bond we have a real opportunities to. Talk about an overview of some of these there's another several of them but in a nutshell for the average person listening are someone who's experienced the criminal justice system. The latest today what was some of both but pulled changes look like. Well this some critical things one that can be found that was the majority of people coming back into prison. Recidivism NC college. Well folks who having a probation and parole technical violations often. Not able to pay their fees and able to get the job because of having been imprisoned. I mean other economic challenges may be committing low level Clarence. I think having to do with violence. It's so there cycling in and out so UC's sound. I legislation and changes that took on a promote from. Investments and probation and parole. Making sure that that system has the resources to help people really be successful. Connecting them with the parents of services that they need. You also going to see apple way of legislative change if we're successful. Looking at non violent offenders and making sure. That when that sending people to prison and who we don't need to sent to prison that we have rehab being the so call habitual offender. Law that many district attorney's abuse part of what we're trying to do was tell truths about what's been happening without being disrespectful to our partners and friends. And so we've been working with prosecutors in DA's the truth is there and in some ways are struggling. To look at the change they still believe that you know status quo and what we've been doing this working. Even though Monica we spent ten months looking at evidence that tells us it's not working. Have to keep communities safe seat and as he bills the do or don't work on work on those issues you gonna see legislation and people accident Danny. Martini that I am really allows us to look at another critical issue and that is the sentences. Of people who should be eligible for parole. I'm this is not a freeing anyone at the drop of the Daryn this is actually just making sure that we are following. The leader of states like Texas states like Florida states like Georgia states like Mississippi and Alabama. None of them as soft on crime with a doing now is being smaller car and South Carolina. They've done justice reinvestment we you're seeing double digit dips in crime. And in their cost they're able to reinvest. And help families in communities be safer and that's what we wanna be able to. We talking about criminal justice reform our guest is fulfilled Daniels CEO and president of foundation for a Louisiana. A lot of talk about the recent rally has but how does the foundation for Louisiana. This particular our organization come to big. Some really lucky and I get to run an organization. That really stands at the intersection. A civic leadership public policy. Community development finance and so we were founded as the Louisiana disaster recovery foundation. And what we've learned over that time mannequin as we helped communities and communities helped us. I'm helped them. In rebuilding housing in small businesses and stoking the local economies and really are investing in people's ability to participate democracy. Planning and things of that nature. What we learned is our best opportunity is to do a couple of things one is to invest in leadership. In a way that identifies the best opportunity. Of people there's families in their communities to be economically strong. To be able to participate in democracy. And and be able to influence public policy so that we can have Penske or change. The other thing that we learned. And that would deeply committed to. From an equity and inclusion perspective. Is making sure that all Louisiana and have a chance to remove barriers. That are keeping them from living the high quality of life in achieving the American dream. It won't surprise you that because Louisiana's most incarcerated state in the union. In the most across route place in the world per capita. Our prison system in the criminal justice system at large. Is keeping tens of thousands. Of really aren't high quality individuals. I'm having access to the opportunity to get jobs to get housing to get education. I'm and we are really around incentivized. To be a part of that so I get the opportunity. Because the organization supports me to serve in the civic capacities. And we get to make small grants and partnership opportunities. With mission critical nonprofits and organizations. That removing that that mission or. Although you talked about incarceration rate not only in this country but around the world give us an example of what that looks like well you know. It's at its niche sting thing we are thirteen times higher than China. Five times higher than Iran are far higher than anywhere else in the US and its whom we tell people that. We get legislators say to us this session I didn't know as much as we've been talking about China we talk about Russia we talk about these places and you go on you know. Those people that we don't we play over there we don't live that list civilized and this is what we do wrong and we've gotten ourselves into a trap Monica. And it's an enormous financial system. This is an uncomfortable thing that people don't write to talk right. But that thousands of jobs attached to the system state line and its people really do him feel like well if you change something may be. That would destabilize. My job you know my wife's job you know we've gotten into this thing which can do with this legislation in these reform packages. Is say it's time for us to our mind. This trouble that we've gotten ourselves into and we can reinvest those resources and create jobs in other ways that actually help of Louisiana fans. Imagine that recently there was a rally in south about the rally what was the response to what happened after that the rally was amazing I've been doing Paulus who worked more than twenty years. There more than 500 people who came from across the state New Iberia Shreveport Munro Baton Rouge. Lake Charles New Orleans you name it. And all of them I'm feeding the kind of profile. On this amazing collection. This partnership. Of cross sector folks who have been working on this they were. Are people of faith. The or business people. And grassroots activists and advocates. You people who themselves have been imprisoned on live had family members in prison they were college students we saw. A bus full of dilly university students there. It's great to see them students from LSU and other places. And they were all they have to see really something really powerful and that is this is our time. One of the speakers on who spoke after me ousted if you referenced this biblical notion of being their furry. Rank in the doesn't matter whether your personal faith and he really spoke to this idea. That like the leaders who came before us whether it's the civil rights movement. Women suffered sharp. You need greet changes. In America that have created opportunities for people this is our chance. Be not afraid we have the data in the evidence to prove. With the right path this we have mission critical leaders who showing them from places we've never seen before. We have certainly seen members of the black caucus and at the more progressive members. Who we now have conservative business people. With the right on crime folks making major investments and being really sincere. As it comes to the table to talk about what these reforms look like we have members of faith community. Black white monitor young old upstate and downstate. Saying this is that time and O'Malley was really. Exemplified. The spirit of really moving this legislation and in this historic moment for. It was similar to a kick off rally that the capital absolutely so any other plans so and the need to be monitoring the bills that will be making their way through the legislative process you've got to believe in what we're asking our friends near and far. At two do you particularly with folks who've had experiences are level we have thinking. About what they think this reform can look like to improve their communities. To reach out to legislators. In their homes places to support this legislation. Really ask them to support the justice reinvestment package. It all goes together it is meant as you say it's not only save money. We start doing things that harm families and communities it will allow us to invest that money into things that will make communities safer. Reduce recidivism. Reduce our prison population. And allow us to be small. And Iran are. And would also impact on the future employment opportunity to people who go through the criminal justice that's. Oh absolutely one of the things that we are excited about. Is this legislation and are all about reps and that it won't. Into proven strategies some of that will be 4 I am 21 century permission control efforts and really make sure people have support systems. Some of that Monica will support partnerships. With the workforce commission with health and hospitals. With the department of families and in children Swedish make sure people have as many supports is necessary. That's what matters. We learned from the Pew Research Center who's been staffing the saffron helping this peacock who. An and quite frankly keeping us out about partisan sort of positions to make sure we was staying focused on on the data. At the most critical time is that first 72 hours. When people get released it they can get the supports it they have somewhere to go that safe. They have family systems and nonprofit networks and other places that are gonna help them. Sort of reenter society. That's our best opportunity we hope to make sure that those resources are reinvested in those. I'm proven proven strategies. And to make sure we get that done. Talking about criminal justice reform our guest this Flozell Daniels the CEO and president of foundation for Louisiana. Final thoughts what should both listening today other than contacting their lawmakers and the but should we be doing all in the average. The average person should be asking itself a critical question. And this is something that we have been thinking about deeply for years Monica since I'm 46. As a second remember we've been saying. Crime is a problem right and we should be tough on car. And it has been the mantra it has been what folks who say it repeatedly so much so that we believe it. Even know we now know it's not true. And so would people should be asking their local legislators. The district attorneys. Who police chiefs and ambulances. Why can't we change. If what we're doing. Hasn't worked. It's created the highest level of incarceration. And was too worried about crime. Maybe we should do something different we can look at the strategies employed that's South Carolina and Texas and Alabama and other places. How do we found create the kind of investments that make our communities safer. And allow us to be more humane and fear indecent. Louisiana people of good people. There's no reason why we should be incarcerated to agree terms higher than people in the states would no different we could people. In the system should treat them like good people and for people that a dangerous we have provisions for the none of this legislation is going to upend our ability to deal with violent. Offenders it just creates space for us to invest in what we know where you for being with with the day. It is the. Beginning of June and by our area it means the beginning of the 2017. And Atlantic hurricane season. Area officials encouraging everyone to be attentive. Make sure you have a plan and they'll wait until the last minute to get your batteries and water and all of your rations keeping fingers crossed but just in case. Area officials are urging all of us not become a place. That is I feel for today thank you so much for joining us until next time enjoy this Sunday and the rest of your week.