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WWL>Topics>>2-4-14 12:10pm Garland with the Idea Village entrepreneurs

2-4-14 12:10pm Garland with the Idea Village entrepreneurs

Feb 4, 2014|

Garland hosts a roundtable discussion with a number of the city's young entrepreneurs and Tim Williamson, CEO of Idea Village.

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

Missed sixteen year old daughter that barely asked me the big thing the other day actually talk to me and said we're like best about your radio show and that's actually. Talking to young people in particular talking to young entrepreneur who wars in particular talking to young onto -- is here problem. Our decisions and other states and I've got that today I mean also from here. But also from out of state and usually -- give. People. Tune in -- on these things. Too excited normally hear more about what Tim Williamson with a presidency. You'll. Bill told us -- the sixth annual New Orleans entrepreneur week tells it. -- grown so great to be here. We are now. Focused on as you said -- -- -- two week march 22 them talk points at the 28. Will be headquartered -- hall we have over 56. Unique events. Free and open to the public but these are solely for entrepreneurs in New Orleans. We're expecting over 15100. Local -- currently participating. And that will be having the -- workshops and how to start a business they'll be experts from around the country about how to pitch for investment or how the structure business. But we have just open up our website no we dot org and OEW dot org. -- first come first serve and -- thing we've Ari sold out five of the sessions of -- solo the first week. Which really speaks to the the onto an oil demand here in New Orleans. Throughout the week we'll have 75 local partners in unique. Entrepreneur pitches will there be presenting. To investors for either capital resources. But I'm really excited about is you have over fifteen partners -- are leveraging in the world is on tweet platform to showcase different industries. So the downtown development district has an arts challenge. At four point those schools has an education challenge. We have a Warner challenge for the water industry we have a food challenge. You're gonna have a terrorism challenge terrorism act upon. So all throughout the week there's fifteen different stages like Jazz Fest of different industries showcasing the optional talent. That all culminates on March 28. On Fulton street. We will have over 5000 people at the big idea. Where is that we believe is the world's largest crowd funding pitch went fifteen in the best new startups. And Fulton street. And we just answering it by the world's would love you join us and participate. I've been in the business so broadcast business offer on. Thirty something years. It's from all time favorite. Merit there was seem like -- some Missouri while technical technological. Innovations that -- Boggle the mind let's talk to us over the young people Chris Stuckey is it with the -- -- dot com yes on -- very well educated you're just maritime architect. They like attack or an engineer and a news graduated commuters in New Orleans -- -- -- -- a local guy you know born and raised in Indiana. I get to you know one of the best programs in the country for an electric. Well yeah I didn't even know -- tell me about true dot -- Essentially Americana is the Amazon.com for the shipbuilding industry. I was frustrated as an engineer working here in New Orleans -- for a great company but. The process is outdated and it's literally flipping through out. -- -- -- So while we're doing is were taking what is already known in the retail space to say you'd find on. Amazon and our new -- dot com engineers can compare. Inching -- and essentially we streamline their -- purchasing process. Who give me an idea of what they've seen in the TO. Well in the real world the engineers have to sourced everything that goes into -- designs though. Right now there's not one stop shop you physically look through catalogs or you can visit -- website and you download PDFs on it's very time consuming so engineers spend more time. Searching for data rather than actually designing. And did org or you can have like warehouses like Amazon dot comers is all virtual. No it's all virtual there's nowhere housing we won't know -- and equipment are. We're just the middleman in terms of we we hold that data and where that middleman between. They engineers this year beaters and we helped shipyards then find the best prices on equipment through the suppliers in the area -- loses some company. That he ends up to being a relatively small special company loses something that can really get it. We project that it's actually become a pretty big companies in terms of there's going to be a lot of manpower in terms of the amount product that we he essentially project on pushing through this site so yeah there's I realized scalability. What do you think troops and -- them pour it seems in today's technology you seem like. Academic. Universities would -- this for the long time you have so they get this question a lot when you look at it. There's a lot of information out there I think for a lot of people -- its data overwhelming. The -- got that. One category at a time so we've got 321 categories if you look at all -- sub categories for well over 7000 categories now we're looking at. Approximately well over thirteen million products. I don't know we're gonna take a break but I'm curious thirteen million product. You come up with the idea. You go to do village where do you get the money to get that people to go look at thirteen million and right to salt where. Put it altogether to mention what what -- but do you get where you war without being totally fund. Bootstrap and right now I did village is they offer us the connections that we need to confront the right people and their resources so. On that's been huge for us that's the big thing about -- absolutely. -- Kiefer idea village of her eyes is a big shopping and you know and very little cash flow putt. Connections. Whether it's friendships. Or our business relationships in its. People around to help you in this city is amazing that so they put us in touch with a lot of key individuals within the shipbuilding industry. And they're excited about it so. We're going forward. All right we're taking a break we're coming right by code were talking about -- whole or -- New Orleans welcomed -- with young people that are giving us. -- -- about the subject that it excites me the most entrepreneur and poor's in New Orleans and my favorite organization. Village. They've got their sixth and New Orleans and -- we come they got 4000 individuals or registered. Or this season is gonna be educational. Consulting and cup programs. Expected to more than a thousand entrepreneur is business people in prominent investors in these students you name it. And the list goes on and -- you went -- you got -- ago. It's not what you think it is some -- -- academics starting -- see and hear things that you wouldn't believe. Its -- you -- a cure for you. -- control what my neighbors who lose I think one of the most innovative educators in this country. And you'll were part of an incubator when he came up but took the exchange through with in school in school yet and school. Tell me what you're going through that in and tell me about it and yes though. For openness schools and can -- -- incubator so I came to them but two years ago and said here's an idea. And I was going to their original program I'm an at the end of that we thought we had something that was really helping students and -- succeed on its own insistence and and school is now reaching hundreds of students we've been around for about eighteen months and our current form. And we are making the process of personalizing learning for students really simple and so we've gotten. Requests from all over the world now we've got hundreds of students in Louisiana and we're expanding its -- again you know. Questionable. Thing -- -- -- beautiful thing I mean we we've been lucky enough to win a lot of awards for work when the teacher America's national social innovation award last year just got named to Forbes thirty -- thirty -- for 2014 about a month ago. So people have been paying attention noticing overdoing -- and it's incredible the response we've seen so far. How old -- 27 mosquito to view. It faiths it's certainly it certainly is and a -- -- again peerless doubles pairs Greek. So explain to -- exactly is Borden board should do share so. And school is trying to personalized learning it you can imagine experience -- but -- had where. Since you're sitting at classroom a couple are probably getting the right lesson but substance aboard because very know at some students are fresher because they're way too far behind. I'm ideally you have a teacher for every student but. It's pretty expensive so and school helps take technology. And give every student the exact rate listen and then to work on everyday so no matter where they started what pace they're learning at. The technology behind it is finding the right resources and is giving them gains or it's giving them puzzles or is giving them video lessons. And as they work it's paying attention to how that happens it's collecting the data about what they're succeeding and what they still need help with. And then it's making sure that the very -- -- is the is also going to be the exact treatments and that step so it's really managing all this data and personalizing experience for every student. Give me a picture of this kids sitting in front of computer. I'm seeing in grade school got somebody next to me and its fooling with pre out to Barack and -- in addition. And in my looking like video game we're looking -- though files open would that work. The easiest and imagines that you've got a regular classrooms students walking and the teachers starting with an important lesson about what the critical mindset for learning. And then when they start -- independent work everybody's got a computer or tablet. And they're working through a website which is and schools to dot org. And today login and ACL. Here's here's my next lesson for the day it's going to be quick intro obviously watched a video and then they go on to a game -- that game is gonna dig deeply and help them could be that there. Building something in 3-D just on you know in a model. It could be yet there on trying to solve the Linear equations been doing it through graphs are supposed to. The traditional way mister Nixon could be working for five years hander behind the class but. Each student has got that sweet if things and then as a teacher -- and the teachers having these really. Couple conversations because they've got all of this incredible data at their fingertips to help guide students in that process. So we're going through and collecting some -- like a quarter million data points. Every year and for just for a single classroom guiding students through one of hundred billion different pathways. And so -- at a time the teacher just trying to BS spreadsheet -- the teachers not to regret any of that. And they can make sure all their time is focused on having an important academic conversation the exact right moment. -- the numbers problem among Christians told me about him putting together millions of data points for naval architecture. Our -- in the naval industry. Now you're talking about millions of data points against an -- rule it. We could get three people and say let's go get a billion different data Bob how do you even begin. Nuggets eight united started very simply as a teacher great teachers. Are often different degree to test is if you've got ten questions on the test for 25 -- 250 different things that you're trying to keep track of I'm as we start to get computer programs a student can work through things a lot faster. And so you can not just needed to get the answer right or wrong if they get it wrong which run yesterday again what does that tell you about what they understand what they don't understand. And how long did -- take in the figured out did they use a calculator that process. You can collect all of the state and if it's just collected it's never helpful -- the pilot things have to sort through but if we -- -- and purposeful way -- really harness it it just gives you incredible insight so it builds over time and every time we had some new element it's gonna get more complicated but luckily. Our goal -- some schools to make it really simple sent by even if he gets complicated in the background the students experience in the teachers' experience in the parents experienced. It just having all that power at their fingertips and the student -- he's exactly right -- in the -- that -- -- yours. -- of these other into the funnel all of this massive information. Not really known exactly what's coming your way where is it three people who rumored 101000 people who room. That are monitoring this how do you monitor and and relatively real time I would think. Respond yet let's start with just a few really incredible educators and people with education experience. Ons that we got a great team I started off as a teachers in New Orleans after the storm -- -- and started teaching. I'm and so. I tried to take into -- -- from that experience. Answer to build them into the algorithms and data processing that are driving it still today. So we're just taking the knowledge that I have as a teacher and that other teachers have. And surging to record that incorporate that so. As it starts to grow on instead of me doing that every single day. All the things they've done in the past -- there automatically. And then as we and more we can just handle more and more by taking that knowledge in baking in the system -- and schools really able to you know -- that knowledge and make it simple -- of people. Review business where a lot of people it's not people imperative it's mostly software driven but that people are critical in the classroom with the students so -- that we have a website consistent and no one and that's great but it's really about the connection between the teacher in that room. And the student is working with them and the website making that interaction so much more purposeful and so much the pattern and education talk. Only about ripple effect. Originated here and you'll -- as food and violent it got people requesting. This all over the world. What's report that renewal I mean anything. New Orleans is just incredible city for education I think we've seen you know who won the most drastic improvement of any city in the country of the last few years. I think you know we've got about twenty to 25 different classrooms in New Orleans we added 2 more this morning. I think people are starting to take notice here especially quickly not just because there from here but also because it's a city it's uniquely positioned. To be open to innovative ideas in education. On it we've actually got several of our classrooms that are in schools are racing community -- students come after school they take the class for credit. In a community setting. And and that's a really innovative ideally we see almost no place else in the country Russians can kind of bring this kind of tool with them outside of the school building but. That's just the kind of environment we're in its entrepreneurial and innovative and it's just unparalleled for education opportunity. If Kim Williams and -- bars -- village. When where and we're a listen there Eliot. I'm looking for the business that brings here's the financial offshoot of -- or Horry and I'll assume -- discussions on big time here. It has the potential to attract business because education. Improved -- With as many things first yeah. Four when -- is doing in other folks within a space Lleyton and bury. Their start to be the vanguards of the education much movement so the first thing was doing is is start to build the case and wants -- great place. As -- said two to identify. Key challenges and create solutions as attracting want partners. To attract investors -- -- attracting an industry around the support this secondarily. As they're creating two schools that created their educational experience. That's whispering now OP pack on the moving here that's -- the home prices are moving up because. If the education system is now becoming better. Therefore it's a better place to live. I need to move back into my kids' homes and I was bringing families home because now's a better educational place. Which that such a great new businesses new restaurants and hot dogs stations in new places are on the but. But -- validates the idea that you know fourteen years much -- great change it starts with -- one not with an idea. A one assault and that's such -- ripple effect of creating change in the community starts to -- happily that's decency here that you start to see some measurable change within their community. All right got to take a break and come back and talk to other Euro entrepreneur who were. And I hate to brag at this point but until field and I do agree on blue eyes. Though he still limited field knows. And a minute. Break come right. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Here because. As we were we've announced does the lineup for -- this six. Annual in the world's entrepreneur week which is the culmination of the idea villagers -- the season which started in July. We have had. Hundreds and hundreds of entrepreneurs who have actually come through. The idea village with our education programs and consulting programs and all culminates march 22 to 28 down in downtown New Orleans. The majority of the programming will be -- brawl. Will have over 56. Unique events. Directly targeted to New Orleans based startups or entrepreneurs. Their free. Opened to the public but is first come first serve so. We're asking anybody whose interest in any type of a notch -- education opportunities. Go to our website no we dot -- and OEW. Dot ORG. There you be able to register. For any our sessions. We've already had about five there are sold out so it is first come first serve will have a waiting list. And secondarily. We are focusing our efforts on the final day which is march 28. Where were hosting. A series events at Fulton street right outside Manning's restaurants and and will we're expecting over 5000 people to attend the final then called the big idea. So anyone can attend you can buy it ship which is like a a chip port 25 dollars and -- actually invest in local company. We think is the world's largest crowd funding. Investor presentation but more importantly Garland. It's a showcase of the -- from ecosystems of so what's to see it feel it touch it. Come to Fulton street march 28 at 5 o'clock and you see something that's really remark. Kind of a big. Kick start. In Edmonton and New Orleans style big time to moralist. Anybody is listen and show a couple of those on March a local art and music. -- Samantha diamond with this we have Monica. You prudential as in. So did you get close to my Q Monica -- facts manager -- -- -- and we have Koreans that it's -- Currently. Are is over those cement that this is something I -- wonder why it hasn't happened before. Cultural connect. What is. So culture connect where technology platform. That helps museums build their own mobile applications for Smartphones and tablets. And the reason why this is not on the market yet already it is the way the technology museum market is structured so there's a couple of museums in the country. That a huge budgets big resources. And all the technology companies kind of cater to them. So there's this huge market midsize museum's 45 museums in New Orleans alone -- midsize museums. That are not cater to you by the technology market so we're coming in and we're solving the problem is serving that market. There aren't too monitor. Tell -- about. Sure so what we provide what we accuse him like just good to build a bit more charred. So what we do is be provider really easy to use a stand. Its web based so a museum director or marketing director catalog on. And we'd provide templates and sort of like the building blocks of different types of apps so museum can create their own -- For instance or working with the preservation resource honor to build a app of all the jazz houses and it tells the history of the jazz musicians that live there and you can have it on your phone and walk around and look at houseware. You know Louis Armstrong lived as a child for instance so that were really bringing this sort of culture alive aren't you a platform that people party haven't their found. Our look back a little bit cement for your from New York yes Monica fire ball from me aren't you guys are sitting in new York and say. Why. Ordered New Orleans and develop this step number one where the idea come from and what did you come here. Yes that we've previously used to work together at an -- e-commerce companies that we spent a couple of years in the arts and technology space and there's a lot of needs enough space. -- is really cared about this sort of intersection of arts -- education. So we first came down to New Orleans it was actually -- four point -- schools we were a fellow in their lunch program with Elliott. And we sort of incubator -- our our idea it took off -- is an amazing place to start a company first of all. Second of -- a company that has anything to do -- culture cultural tourism. Battalion that replicates. -- couldn't tell you live in New York City -- X. You've got Europe that are war why here why would -- -- come in all. I think New Orleans and generals a city that's very proud of its character and were really for focusing on smaller local institutions really bringing alive histories for a global audience but that are very local and individual like really. Helping these institutions tell their stories and New Orleans has a lot of stories to tell. Aren't rich quick break here come back to -- two more about this. And from our other entrepreneurs were talking about I did village six and -- New Orleans on trump wouldn't rule week -- Still doesn't know which we could broadcast the comment shall -- -- off -- year this thing would talk about. Tim ma Tim Williamson. Presidency you bill. A more true security issue again for people who have just tuned in. Tell what's come -- and get an idea of which you've accomplished. Well and the idea villages -- fourteen years old she could match and we started in 2000. Five entrepreneurs in the bar with a crazy ideas that that on its partnership could create a positive change in the city. And the good news is grown I think we're start as he. Significant progress towards that. Recently New Orleans is ranked as in the one green magnate the number three destiny for technology jobs and something that came out recently that. In the one place for people their primed to move people their prime jobs. And it's not just denied the village effort this whole collaboration of our partners I think we talked about four when those schools and you know -- -- -- fun and the downtown development district and Urban League is a nice network of folks. But recently over the last five years we were who were 2500 odd partners. Of those we've selected -- 131 into our consulting programs and apple programs. Good news 81% of those -- -- business which. They've raised over 55 million dollars in private capital they're doing. About 78 million dollars in annual revenue increase -- thousand jobs. 85% are still here is staying in the warrantless but it's also the foundation of group that's now. Creating jobs and mentoring back the next arch partners so. Right now we're looking at new laws are in a week which is march 22 28 which is the culmination of our annual on the season. And we're going to be having 56 different events throughout the week free and open to the public the guys go to our web site to register. No we got or and we W dot org. And also units through the companies we have here we're going to be showcasing 75 the best start ups throughout the -- -- Warner education. Technology. And it culminates at the big idea at 5 o'clock and Manning's of -- -- or we hope 5000 people in the world's largest crowd from the so. Bigger every year to aren't I want to go back to Monica. You're with cold true cultural connect. Yes all right. I and had of those New Orleans music. Your you normally -- you come to the NC I would like cute use cold truth connect in what happened what is. So what it is is a software that allows museums to build their own mobile laps. They. There wasn't the leaderboard what I do with the museum. With a mobile -- Sure so you basically can offer visitors who are in your museums and folks who are far away -- can afford to come here museum access to your content in an engaging way. Which means. Instead of just. Reading about a painting or looking at it without any context these are tools that actually help tell a story about the museum's content. Make it engaging. Make people you know excited and able to interact with. All right to for cement figures your partner. This sounds like good show I can't -- undertaking. Does this take a ton of people or is this something that to a -- work. Thinks like you talked about bootstrap paying and I think -- -- and entrepreneurship is that you have to do a lot with very little so Monica and I are dedicated full time into the venture. We work with the designer and we work with the developer is also based in new Marlins. So we start small you battery you you know build layers on top of players. Also one of the exciting things about technology and software is that their businesses that can scale. You can have you put a certain amount of effort and up front and then you can reuse the software over and over and over again serving many institutions. Shouldered -- it's -- like building a franchise -- it's very tough. Get -- 12345. But. One of the institute who leads the foreign expert and actually you grow that's right that's right. Is this something that could benefit New Orleans. -- -- long were absolutely so I think you know you're asking before why did we come down here this is a great market to do anything and culture and cultural tourism. And I think one of the things that we can really offers the ability to put New Orleans on a national stage. Really communicate to the rest of the country hey you know you're interested in the content of the New Orleans museum of art or about jazz musicians we have the ability to transmit. Around the country and make New Orleans a place for really cutting edge innovation in arts and culture. Could do is there and think there's an offshoot to this I've always wondered. We've we've talked about it earlier is from where there's not a TV show. Based on or is this something that can mutate into many many different things in or. Absolutely serve -- now were actually working to build out video capabilities so it might not be a TV show but a small baby step toward that vision is. Having videos as you mentioned artists talking about their craft talking about the process talking about their inspiration. And you can hear all of this and interact with the artist while viewing their painting an amusing. And it's moving to television definitely everything's moving to absolutely the iPad in the 40. As Elliot mention there's actually more Smartphones on the planet and people so. This is not even the future it's now. What risk we just have few minutes number if you give me some quick characters. Chris -- go back to use. You're drew developing highly sophisticated. Bootstrap August -- people listening today. Why should they take a chance of being an entrepreneur more or should. They should actually take a chance on. To me. It's it's a challenge if you enjoy challenge yet it is taking ahead on their summer recess or. So many resources out there just to learn something to teach yourself. You shouldn't -- on -- do something for you just do -- if you got an idea what it really comes down to it's not the idea of the X accuse him and you just have to send it. It. Yet I mean I think it's not for everybody there's a lot of trade -- right you give up a lot in terms of security in terms of predictability. But also I think there's certain challenges where. When you find something he really passion about solving and they're just doesn't seem to be anyway you can find. To use whatever is out there to solve -- I think there's an compel certain people to go out and and keep pushing and so I think. Again the more young people that see themselves dedicated and devoted problems they really feel passion about the more PB -- willing to make. That decision and you know make between -- that it required some. Yeah I definitely think that there's a lot of -- as Elliott says it's not an easy thing to do and some people are compel and some people just wanna do it but I think. Regardless of how difficult it is the most important things to find your community. We definitely found our community very quickly with idea village and only other entrepreneurs that are there and that makes the most difficult day actually really rewarding. Monica. I think entrepreneurship is not one big decision it's a series of little decisions and if you're curious or have an idea or have a problem you wanna take on. You can always take that first step that's how we started a series of little steps and it can Samantha said meeting people in the community that -- -- along your path and idea village and for -- schools and all the resources here in New Orleans to do exactly about. They're all coming back to audit you village what what you give them when they sure that the -- Well I think what we have been able to do over the last forty years is build this. And -- for the incredible network. Of professionals and investors and corporations and CEOs and other organizations mentioned. They're collaborating in the very. Some be ironic way to support local -- partners so. If you're not for a New Orleans you can have access to the great organizations with the CEOs of the investors. And also this network is global you know folks from around the world -- -- -- -- grew up your sales force or. -- -- In the world has built a a very dynamic ecosystem -- network of support so you're not are your relief. One person away from whoever you want. And our job is sort try to identify you know its partners and support them keep them here in New Orleans. When I -- separation zones good entrepreneur week who want him. Entrepreneur week is march 22 to the 28. It will be has court take out your haul all throughout the week is free. And open to the public but you must register a first come first serve. And you go to no we got or an OEW dot org to register for any of the sessions will be 56 unique events. And and that the second thing is on the final day of march 28 we had the big idea which is a a community crowd funding pitch where when -- he -- point five dollar -- so local starts we believe is the world's largest -- analysis -- is not. But it really is an opportunity to to release CD onto -- movement firsthand. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

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